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Beauty supplements are fast becoming the latest hot topic in skincare and for good reason. The global beauty ingestible industry is expected to be worth US$ 8.30 billion by the year 2030. 

In conjunction with topical treatments, getting the right nutrients internally can do major things for the health of your skin. This is because sometimes a little help from within is required to maintain a bouncy, healthy complexion. Ideally, you would get all the vitamins and minerals you need from your diet. However, even the healthiest eaters could enjoy a boost of supplementation.

What is Ingestible Beauty?

Ingestible beauty supplements are pills, powders, or liquids that you ingest into your body. These products aim to assist with a specific concern relating to your hair, skin, or nails. The current ingestible beauty boom can contribute to people wanting to enhance their skincare routines and look at ways that they can feel good and look their best. 

The medium in which these supplements come in does not have an impact on the absorption of the product. However, the ingredient amount does. For example, for collagen to be effective, you need at least 10 000 mg per serving. 

Using beauty supplements

Now, before you go ahead and incorporate a beauty supplement into your routine, you need to read the ingredient list on the packaging. 

Beauty supplements are generally safe to use as long as you ingest the amount that is recommended by the manufacturer. As with anything we take orally, there is a chance of allergic reactions and gastrointestinal disturbances such as bloating and gas may take place.

Here are some of the trending ingestible beauty supplements that should be on your radar. 

Collagen supplements 

Collagen supplements shouldn’t be new to you, we have seen them gaining popularity these past three years. If you’re struggling with a dull complexion, chances are your hair and mood are on the lackluster side too. Taking a high-dose collagen peptide supplement will drive real, lasting results from beyond the surface. The key benefits are improved skin tone, elasticity, and hydration, thicker hair, as well as longer and stronger nails.

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, found in the framework of your cells and tissues. It is the main component of the body’s connective tissue, helping to make up your skin, hair, nails, joints, bones, cartilage, and ligaments. Collagen is one of the proteins that gives your skin its plumpness, hair its density, and nails its strength.

The body’s ability to produce and turn over its own collagen supply – as with many things – slows down over time, decreasing by about 1% to 1.5% every year from your 20s onward. This depletion is one of the factors in the development of wrinkles, fine lines, and sagging skin. It also contributes to hair thinning, breakage, brittle nails, and poor bone health.

collagen

fizkes/shutterstock

When collagen peptides are ingested, they stimulate fibroblast proliferation in the dermal layers, triggering the production of collagen, elastin, and hyaluronic acid in the skin. It’s a way to drive visible results from the inside out. 

Using Collagen for beauty

Collagen liquid or powder is super easy to add to your everyday routine, you take it, and it supplies your body with key nutrients. A good collagen supplement contains a high dose of collagen peptides (10 000 mcg or more per dose) derived from animals such as fish, cows, pigs, or chickens. Collagen supplements are usually tasteless and granulated. This makes them super-fast dissolving – perfect for adding to a cup of coffee, tea, smoothie, or juice.

Another benefit is that collagen supplements could help to boost your mood and put a little pep back into your step. This is because one of the primary amino acids found in collagen is glycine, which is known to increase your serotonin levels.

My collagen product recommendations: 

AMAZON CHOICE

Silica

Silica is a superstar in the beauty world, supporting your body’s ability to produce collagen and maintain healthy hair, skin, and nails. We’re talking thicker hair with less breakage, firmer and smoother skin, and long, strong nails. Because this wonder mineral is an overachiever, it also gives you a glow because it increases the transport of nutrients and oxygen to your skin. Because of that, your skin stays hydrated.

In science-speak, when the elements silicon (Si) and oxygen (O) combine, you get silica (SiO2), which is also known as silicon dioxide. This under-the-radar mineral occurs in the human body – but can be derived from many places such as quartz dust and dark leafy greens – and plays an important role in collagen synthesis. In fact, since silica is required for building collagen, one could say that without it, we’d fall apart. 

Like collagen, silica production slows from around the age of 25. So you should start looking at taking silica in your late 20s or early 30s, or when you start to see fine lines appearing. Of course, prevention is always better than cure. 

Yes, you can boost your intake of silica by eating more bitter foods. However, the only way to get enough is to supplement. As a supplement, silica can be taken in gel, capsule, or liquid form.

My silica product recommendations: 

ALEXIA RICH Liquid Silica, ALEXIA RICH Gel, and ALEXIA RICH Active Capsules.

Conclusion

A supplement regimen can work in synergy with your diet and a regular topical skincare routine for the best skin health. You don’t need a beauty supplement to live a healthy lifestyle, but incorporating a supplement will only benefit you. 

Incorporating ingestible beauty supplements will not only boost your beauty but your whole body, too.

MAIN IMAGE CREDIT: Photo by Artem Podrez/Pexels
Dr Alek Nikolic

Dr Alek Nikolic

Dr Alek Nikolic is a renowned specialist in aesthetic medicine and is at the forefront of the latest developments in his field. With a focus on skin care, skin ingredients and cosmetic dermatology treatments such as lasers, chemical peels, Botox, and Dermal Fillers, he has performed over 20 000 procedures to date and is responsible for training many medical practitioners both locally and internationally. After receiving his MBBCh from the University of the Witwatersrand (1992) he went on to do an MBA at University of Cape Town (2000). With over 24 year in private practice, he has lectured and performed live demonstrations across the globe, including Bangkok, Rome, Paris, Monte Carlo, Prague, and Warsaw.  Some of his achievements include: Owner of Aesthetic Facial Enhancement Owner of online skincare store, com. Founding member of the South African Allergan Medical Aesthetic Academy Advisor to Allergan Local Country Mentor in Facial Aesthetics   Vice President of the Aesthetic and Anti-Aging Medicine Society of South Africa(AAMSSA) Associate Member of the American Society of Laser Medicine and Surgery(ASLMS).

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